DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD                                Earthwise, an architectural salvage company specializing in reclaiming building materials from northwest buildings, opened its new store in Aberdeen at 416 N. Park St. Saturday morning. From left are Aaron Blanchard, Linda Privately, Paul Petrauskus, Kurt Petrauskas, Aberdeen City Council president Tawni Andrews, Casey Patrick and store manager Mal Moran.

DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD Earthwise, an architectural salvage company specializing in reclaiming building materials from northwest buildings, opened its new store in Aberdeen at 416 N. Park St. Saturday morning. From left are Aaron Blanchard, Linda Privately, Paul Petrauskus, Kurt Petrauskas, Aberdeen City Council president Tawni Andrews, Casey Patrick and store manager Mal Moran.

Earthwise opens 10,000-square-foot location on North Park in Aberdeen

A new business that sells reclaimed building materials from Northwest homes is finding Aberdeen to be a productive location, with dozens of shoppers showing up and not just browsing, but buying, when Earthwise opened its doors Saturday morning.

Out front, a barbecue with burgers and hot dogs provided shoppers with a snack as they awaited the store’s official ribbon cutting. Several Aberdeen City Council members were on hand when the ribbon was cut at 11:30 a.m. by council president Tawni Andrews. Several hundred people made their way through the store in its first day alone.

The store, all 10,000 square feet of it, is located at 416 N. Park St., the site of the old Ford dealership. A big blue arrow hanging from the ceiling points toward the old service area, but it is now festooned with long lines of reclaimed fishing floats.

The main entrance takes shoppers straight to old windows — dozens of them — and a selection of sinks, toilets and other plumbing fixtures ranging from the very old to quite modern. Nearby, a bathtub full of reclaimed fishing nets in surprisingly good condition are for sale for a dollar a foot.

The wide-open floor plan provides plenty of room for shoppers. Along the aisles are shelves stacked with complete cabinet sets, chairs and other furniture items, and unique finds such as old theater seats, antique trunks and klieg-style lighting — the kind used to light stages for music and theatrical productions. There are dozens of doors, ranging from front to indoor to barn, lining one wall, next to some live-edge wood items and a large selection of flooring. There are appliances, including washers and dryers and old tubs, including some of the claw-foot variety.

Lighting fixtures including some unique chandeliers hang from the ceiling in one room. Another section offers hundreds of pieces of hardware, from old-school door knobs to hinges and the like. A large case holds assorted antique knick-knacks and smaller appliances.

Store manager Mal Moran told customers to come back regularly, as the inventory can change often, and more items are already on the way this week. Store hours are 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. five days a week — it’s closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.