The Women’s Christian Temperance Union was one of the driving forces behind the Volstead Act instituting Prohibition in the United States. In their fight to create an alcohol and drug-free society, the WCTU traveled the country dedicating elaborate “temperance fountains” in hopes that drinkers would opt for clean, cold water instead of visiting the local saloon. Aberdeen’s fountain was dedicated on Feb. 6, 1910, in front of the George J. Wolff department store (present-day Arby’s location) at the corner of Heron and H Streets. Note the “dog trough” facing the street at puppy level. The fountain was later moved to Sam Benn Park, where it stood for many years before it was taken down. The bulbous ornamental top of the fountain was donated to the Aberdeen Museum several years ago. (Roy Vataja Collection)

The Women’s Christian Temperance Union was one of the driving forces behind the Volstead Act instituting Prohibition in the United States. In their fight to create an alcohol and drug-free society, the WCTU traveled the country dedicating elaborate “temperance fountains” in hopes that drinkers would opt for clean, cold water instead of visiting the local saloon. Aberdeen’s fountain was dedicated on Feb. 6, 1910, in front of the George J. Wolff department store (present-day Arby’s location) at the corner of Heron and H Streets. Note the “dog trough” facing the street at puppy level. The fountain was later moved to Sam Benn Park, where it stood for many years before it was taken down. The bulbous ornamental top of the fountain was donated to the Aberdeen Museum several years ago. (Roy Vataja Collection)

A smattering of events from early 1910

  • Tue Feb 25th, 2020 4:30pm
  • Life

A hodge-podge of history items from the local papers that had people talking in Aberdeen 110 years ago.

Mrs. C.T. Wooding had the body of her sister, Mrs. Addie Crowther, removed to a crypt in the mausoleum, directly under that of Mr. Crowther. (The Crowther-Wooding building — present day Billy’s Restaurant — was named for these two families) — Aberdeen Herald, Feb. 24, 1910

Bert Collins, an Aberdeen boy, was committed to the state training school, by the superior court Monday for incorrigibility. — Aberdeen Herald, Feb. 24, 1910

LIQUOR TO MINORS — Geo. Ratty and Louis LaCasse, who live in a waterfront shack near the Western Mill, were arrested Friday at the instance of Special Officer A.H. Hause, charged with enticing boys to their shack and plying them with liquor. It is said that Bert Collins, who was committed to the state training school last week, owed his downfall to that shack. At a hearing before Judge Bush, LaCasse and Ratty were bound over to answer in the superior court. — Aberdeen Herald, Feb. 28, 1910

Arthur Pearson and Arnold Hicking, loggers who have been living at Moclips, were arrested in this city Friday, by Deputy Sheriff Samuels, of Moclips. The men left Moclips soon after a fire in the store of W.S. McRay, when merchandise valued at about $40, was missed, and suspicion pointed to Pearson and Hicking. Deputy Samuels was unable to find sufficient evidence to justify holding the men, and they were released. — Aberdeen Herald, Feb. 28, 1910

BROWNELL MOVES — C.E. Brownell, the veteran grocer, moved his stock Saturday to 213 West Heron Street, near the Washington Hotel.

The new location is a distinct improvement over his former store, at 216 East Heron Street. The new store will be refurnished completely, with new, up-to-date methods for storing groceries, fruits and vegetables, and a feature of the establishment will be the careful attention paid to cleanliness and sanitation.

An entirely new stock will be put in, consisting of everything in the grocery, vegetable and delicatessen line, and the closeness of the establishment to the residence district, will no doubt result in a largely increased business for the pioneer grocer of Aberdeen. — Feb. 28, 1910

FIRE LAST NIGHT — The early discovery of a fire in the Wheeler Bros., 108½ South G Street, about 9 o’clock last evening, was all that prevented a serious conflagration. The alarm was turned in, and promptly responded to by the fire department, and the blaze extinguished. The fire originated from a gas jet, the heat from which melted the solder in a joint, and the escaping gas was quickly in a flame. — Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

CURIO FOUND — While one of the workmen on the new (Weatherwax) high school building was chipping a large stone block yesterday, a small insect showing signs of life was found. Professor Greenleaf thinks it is at least 1,000 years old, and Professor Hodge is preparing to send it to the Smithsonian Institute at Washington. — Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

BUSY POLICE — During the month of February, the police department made 117 arrests, served 616 meals, collected $1,350 in fines from prisoners, $32 in dog taxes and $4 in cow fines. — Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

PIONEER MERCHANT RETIRES — George Fisher, the pioneer clothing merchant of Aberdeen, has sold his store, 411 East Heron Street, to H. and P. Abrahamson, and will hereafter devote his entire attention to this San Francisco store.

Mr. Fisher has been engaged in the clothing business in Aberdeen for the past 20 years. For the past seven years he has also conducted a store in San Francisco, to which place he was compelled to move his family on account of Mrs. Fisher’s health, and his final departure from Aberdeen is regretted by a host of friends. — Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

INFORMATION WANTED — Information wanted as to the whereabouts of William Borger, last heard of in Aberdeen last September. Borger is of dark complexion, 5 feet 6 inches in height, weighs about 160 pound and of stooped stature. He is a fireman by occupation and may be working in a logging camp. Information will be gladly received by Mrs. George White, 1015 North G Street, Tacoma, Wash. — Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

SLIDE OCCURS AS STIFF GALE BLOWS — Following in the wake of the storm which swept Grays Harbor Sunday, come reports of considerable damage. Many rafts of logs in the harbor were broken up or went adrift. The rainfall was great and the rivers of the county are filled to the banks and running over.

The home of J. Luke, near Electric Park (present-day site of the PUD), was carried seventy-five feet from its foundation by a landslide; Mrs. Luke and babe were not injured.

The wind attained a velocity of sixty miles an hour and ships in the harbor had to drop both anchors to keep from being blown on the sands. – Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

The telephone line will be extended from Hoquiam to Moclips during the coming summer. — Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

Telephone subscribers can now telephone their telegraph messages to the Western Union for transmission, such instructions have been received at the local office. — Aberdeen Herald, March 3, 1910

FOUNTAIN IS DEDICATED – The drinking fountain, donated to the city by the ladies of the W.C.T.U. and which is located on the corner of Heron and H Streets, was formally dedicated and turned over to the city yesterday at 3 p.m.

The dedicatory services were conducted by the local organization, and were attended by a large gathering of citizens. Rev. B.F. Brooks invoked the aid of Deity in perpetuating the work of the Union. Miss Stone in a short but well prepared address dedicated the fountain and C.C. Quakenbush in behalf of the city council accepted the gift in a choice and well delivered speech and Rev. E.R. Prichard pronounced the benediction.

The fountain is a fine imitation of bronze and is substantial and artistic in appearance, and will always be an ornament to the city. — Aberdeen Herald, Feb. 7, 1910

Roy Vataja is the son of Finnish immigrants and considers both water and beer to be of equal value.