Life

Dear Journal: Shootings — they continue to be the story of our lives

Editor’s note: Karen Harris Tully is a writer who lives in Raymond…

  • Apr 12th, 2021

 

Harbor Drug, Hoquiam Elks taking appointments for April 19 vaccine clinic at the lodge

There will be 400 first doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine available…

 

Add these inside chores to your spring-cleaning list

’Nailing it Down’ By Dave Murnen and Pat Beaty

  • Apr 10th, 2021

 

April in Hoquiam circa 1911

‘Nothing New’ By Roy Vataja

  • Apr 10th, 2021
COURTESY PHOTO 
Bridget “Birdie” Tyler, a resident of Riverside Place in Hoquiam, turns 104 Saturday.

Hoquiam resident turns 104

Ireland-born Bridget “Birdie” Tyler, a resident of Riverside Place in Hoquiam, turns…

COURTESY PHOTO 
Bridget “Birdie” Tyler, a resident of Riverside Place in Hoquiam, turns 104 Saturday.
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Mr. Tux — Adoptable Pet of the Week

Mr. Tux is 21 pounds of black-tie affair. Nothing about Mr. Tux…

  • Apr 7th, 2021
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Rescued bunnies galore available for adoption through PAWS

The Easter bunny has come and gone this year, but there are…

  • Apr 7th, 2021
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5oth wedding anniversary — Jerry and Linda Charlton

Montesano residents Jerry and Linda Charlton recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.…

  • Apr 6th, 2021
feature photo NOW
DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD 
Lydia Rush, left, of Poulsbo, was one of the vendors at the glass float show at the Westport Maritime Museum Saturday. Rush displayed the floats she’s collected over the years, mostly during her time living in Japan. Here she talks with a family that had just returned from the beach cleanup and glass float search that ran along with the show. Vendors had floats of all shapes and sizes for sale and were available to appraise floats brought to the show, including some found by beach cleanup volunteers that day.

Glass float show draws enthusiasts to Westport

Lydia Rush, left, of Poulsbo, was one of the vendors at the…

DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD 
Lydia Rush, left, of Poulsbo, was one of the vendors at the glass float show at the Westport Maritime Museum Saturday. Rush displayed the floats she’s collected over the years, mostly during her time living in Japan. Here she talks with a family that had just returned from the beach cleanup and glass float search that ran along with the show. Vendors had floats of all shapes and sizes for sale and were available to appraise floats brought to the show, including some found by beach cleanup volunteers that day.
DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD 
“Siren Ophelia” greeted visitors to the International Mermaid Museum at the Westport Winery Saturday.

Ribbon cut Saturday at International Mermaid Museum

Opening week at the International Mermaid Museum drew mermaid enthusiasts, media and…

DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD 
“Siren Ophelia” greeted visitors to the International Mermaid Museum at the Westport Winery Saturday.
DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD 
About 1,500 pounds of trash collected by volunteers from the beaches between Westport and Tokeland was brought back to the Westport Maritime Museum Saturday. The cleanup was organized by the Olympia chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, Twin Harbors Waterkeepers, and the Grays Harbor Stream Team. Pacific Seafoods provided a truck to haul some of it away, and the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association helped out. “The support of the industry is a great help in this whole process,” said John Shaw, museum director. “It also helps with the recycling of some of the materials.”

Beach cleanup collects piles of trash from south beaches

Volunteers collected about 1,500 pounds of trash Saturday from the beaches between…

DAN HAMMOCK | THE DAILY WORLD 
About 1,500 pounds of trash collected by volunteers from the beaches between Westport and Tokeland was brought back to the Westport Maritime Museum Saturday. The cleanup was organized by the Olympia chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, Twin Harbors Waterkeepers, and the Grays Harbor Stream Team. Pacific Seafoods provided a truck to haul some of it away, and the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association helped out. “The support of the industry is a great help in this whole process,” said John Shaw, museum director. “It also helps with the recycling of some of the materials.”

Dear Abby: I’m a single mom.

Advice column

  • Apr 5th, 2021