An unidentified officer stands near a kennel holding many of Jacob Hadaller’s German shepherds in this image obtained by a Chronicle public records request. Hadaller’s neighbors complained that the dogs frequently run loose and terrorize the neighborhood around Birley Road in Mossyrock. (Lewis County Sheriff’s Office)

An unidentified officer stands near a kennel holding many of Jacob Hadaller’s German shepherds in this image obtained by a Chronicle public records request. Hadaller’s neighbors complained that the dogs frequently run loose and terrorize the neighborhood around Birley Road in Mossyrock. (Lewis County Sheriff’s Office)

Mossyrock man whose dogs terrorized neighborhood sentenced to more than three years

The Chronicle

Jacob Hadaller, the man who gained local notoriety for owning a pack of unrestrained German shepherds who ran amok near Mossyrock, was sentenced last week to 45 months in custody of the state Department of Corrections after pleading guilty to drug and gun-related charges.

Hadaller was the subject of a Joint Narcotics Enforcement Team investigation that concluded with a SWAT raid on his residence in July 2018. Additionally, he pleaded to a count of bail jumping after forfeiting a $250,000 bond.

The Chronicle previously reported that agents turned up a quarter pound of heroin, a small amount of methamphetamine, more than $5,000 in cash, a digital scale, drug packaging, Oxycontin pills, Suboxone strips, pistols, holsters and ammunition.

At his father’s home, law enforcement officers seized three more firearms, including a “Tommy gun,” and Hadaller claimed to have hidden more weapons in “the hills.” Beneath the floorboards of his father’s home, agents located a safe with $95,000 in cash, on which a narcotics K-9 detected the odor of drugs.

Hadaller pleaded guilty on Jan. 3 to three counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and single counts of possession of a controlled substance and bail jumping. He was sentenced on Jan. 24 by Judge Andrew Toynbee, according to court records.

Hadaller’s pack of 17 German shepherds — who neighbors say killed pets and harassed livestock — were removed from Hadaller’s property in October, and were adopted out. The dogs stopped showing signs of aggression once they were separated, said animal shelter staff.